• 2018 March 13 18:16

    Subsea Industries presents its underwater coating systems

    Subsea Industries’ NACE coatings inspector Manuel Hof explains why shipowners can no longer afford to gloss over the marine environment issue, the company said in its press release.

    “Today’s ships are expected to demonstrate their environmental credentials in many different areas, including emissions, non-toxicity, fuel savings and more.

    That’s why Subsea Industries stresses that its underwater coating systems provide an optimum solution for reducing fuel consumption by maintaining a smooth surface and reducing fouling in the most environmentally-safest way possible.

    Indeed, independent tests carried out in the Netherlands and Canada have verified that all the company’s coatings – Ecospeed, Ecoshield, Ecofix, Ecolock and Ecolast –are totally biocide-free and 100% non-toxic. This means there is no negative effect on the water column or the wider marine environment at any point in their use.

    Furthermore, virtually zero volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released into the atmosphere during application, unlike the massive amounts of VOC and zinc anode emissions associated with conventional hull coating or protection systems.

    Zinc anodes are used to limit corrosion to metal surfaces that come into contact with seawater; the idea being that the anode corrodes rather than the steel surface to which it is fixed. Anodes thus can release highly toxic metals into the water, particularly when the hull protective coating is damaged leaving the steel exposed. As hard coatings, Subsea Industries’ coatings are much more resistant to damage than conventional paints.

    Subsea Industries coating systems require only two coats of 500µm each applied to bare steel, aluminium or glass-reinforced plastic. These two layers form a homogenous protective coating capable of lasting the life of the vessel. No primer, no midcoat, no tiecoat, or no topcoat are needed.

    Typical antifouling paint is applied in three or four layers and needs to be reapplied every three or four years. This will reach a point where the surface becomes too uneven because of the number of layers and resulting internal stress build-up. Then a full re-blast and re-coat will be required, meaning a considerable environmental hazard is created each time, resulting in creation of potentially toxic debris during blasting and VOC emissions when the fresh paints are applied.

    Many hull coatings contain biocides to prevent fouling by marine organisms, although the strongest and most effective biocide, tributyl tin (TBT) has now been banned. For the biocide to work, the coating must release toxins into the water. Where there is a high concentration of shipping, such as in ports and busy shipping lanes, these toxins can rise to a high-level, which has an adverse effect on fisheries and other marine life. As Subsea Industries’ products are totally biocide free no toxins are released.

    If a conventionally-coated hull is cleaned to remove fouling, even more biocides are released into the water, along with surviving organisms which are detached from the hull. The risk of introduction of invasive non-native species is thus very high, a similar risk to that imposed by discharge of ballast water. Concerns have been expressed that even more non-indigenous species (NIS) may be transported through hull fouling than through ships’ ballast water.

    In most ports around the world, underwater cleaning has come under scrutiny out of fear that viable NIS are released and spread by the operation, rather than contained and disposed of. Several ports and countries have banned underwater cleaning out of concerns of the pulse release of biocides and an increased risk of transferring NIS.

    Another important outcome of the independent test carried out by the Dutch authorities was the submission of the results to port authorities and environmental agencies worldwide in order to allow underwater cleaning of Subsea Industries coating systems. As a result, several economically important ports have made an exception to the ban and this only for Subsea Industries coatings. These ports recognise the negative impact of biocidal paints and want to support environmentally safe solutions.

    Subsea Industries has designed special tools that can be used for regular frequent in-water cleaning of hulls coated with Ecospeed. No damage is caused to the surface of the coating and none of the coating is removed – in fact the cleaning process makes the hull even smoother, further enhancing the hydrodynamic characteristics.

    A hydrodynamically smooth hull, with an absence of fouling build-up, has a significant positive impact on fuel consumption.

    A fouled hull carries with it a fuel penalty. The worse the fouling, the slower the ship will sail at a given rpm. More power will be required to keep the ship sailing at a given speed. This means higher fuel consumption. Depending on the degree of fouling, this can be as much as 85% more. Higher fuel consumption results in more greenhouse gases and other emissions which pollute the earth’s atmosphere.

    The annual fuel consumption by the world fleet is estimated at 350 million tonnes. This implies an annual CO2 output of approximately 850 million - 1.1 billion tonnes. On a global scale the potential for the reduction in fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions is enormous. If 80% of the world fleet would switch from biocidal antifoulings to Subsea Industries coating systems, this would save an estimated 28.5 million tonnes in annual fuel consumption and 90 million tonnes in annual CO2 output.

    Subsea Industries offers a TBT-free, copper-free and biocide-free solution, which release no toxins at any stage, improves with maintenance, and helps reduce emissions of greenhouse gases, sulphur and nitrogen oxides, particulate matter, zinc anode emissions and VOCs. This makes Subsea Industries coating systems the Best Available Technology for companies that take their environmental responsibility seriously.”
     
    About Subsea Industries

    Antwerp-headquartered Subsea Industries, established in 1983, is a pioneer in the development of hard hull coating systems and hull and propeller cleaning systems.
    In 2002, after three years’ extensive research and development, the company introduced Ecospeed as an environmentally safe underwater hull coating system, capable of improving ship performance, providing long-term fouling protection and reducing the impact of ship operations on the environment. Widely considered as an asset rather than a consumable – since one-coat lasts the vessel’s life time and is deemed part of a vessel’s structure, Ecospeed now has more than 700 marine references.
    Ecospeed is type approved by Lloyd’s Register as an abrasion resistance coating for ice-class ships and has DNV GL approval for use as a coating in ballast water tanks.




2018 December 15

16:23 MOL Passenger Line receives award for outstanding performance in 'Cruise of the Year 2018'
14:53 CMA CGM to implement GRR for India East Coast-West Africa trade
13:51 CMA CGM announces LSS on services from / to China, Hong Kong and Taiwan
12:44 NYK Cruises receives Grand Prix Award for 2018 World Cruise
11:27 TT-Line places order for RoPax "green" ferry with China's Jiangsu Jinling Shipyard

2018 December 14

18:17 Hapag-Lloyd to increase rates from East Asia to Mexico, Central America, West Coast of South America, Caribbean & Panama
17:48 Petersburg Oil Terminal puts into operation its emergency response team
17:33 Vinalines to open container shipping centre next week
17:30 Fairway adjustment will simplify Elbe traffic control already next year
17:27 Final cruise ship for the year calls to the Port of Gothenburg
17:23 The MV Magda joins the Klaveness Bulkhandling pool
17:16 India’s containerised export up 10% in the third quarter of 2018
17:13 FSL Trust announces newbuilding agreement for the construction of two LR2 product tankers
17:13 Havyard project with Havila Kystruten on hydrogen-powered coastal route operations to receive over NOK 100 million in funding from Pilot-E
16:24 World Fuel Services expands bunker operations in US leading up to 2020
15:57 IMO held training workshops in Cameroon Single Window for Foreign Trade Transactions
14:49 Onezhsky Shipyard lays down self-propelled hopper barge of Project HB600
14:08 Irish Continental Group plc takes delivery of cruise ferry W.B.Yeats
13:55 WMU takes part in Ocean Literacy Conference
13:31 First in industry ADNOC co-loads LPG and propylene onto same vessel in Ruwais
13:10 WMU hosted round table discussion regarding key challenges facing IMO
12:53 Bunker market at the Port of Saint-Petersburg, Russia shows mixed price movements (graph)
12:32 Nordic American Offshore secures contract for its PSV NAO Viking
12:11 Rosrybolovstvo supports 2nd Dredging and Hydraulic Engineering Structures Congress
11:50 Association of Commercial Sea Ports celebrates its 30th anniversary
11:24 Gazprom and Itochu sign MoU under Baltic LNG project
11:06 Scorpio Bulkers announces time charter-out agreement
10:48 Domestic ferry safety exercise conducted in Indonesia
10:25 IMO holds training for managing insecurity in west Indian Ocean and Gulf of Aden
10:06 EC adds six new yards to its ‘European List of ship recycling facilities’
09:47 Brent Crude futures price down 0.61% to $61.05, Light Sweet Crude – down 0.4% to $52.37
09:25 GTT notified by HSHI for the tank design of two new LNG carriers for CMM
09:18 Baltic Dry Index is up to 1,365 points
08:06 Fincantieri publishes its Sustainability Plan 2018-2022
07:14 Port of Long Beach cargo volume up to 621,835 TEU in November 2018
06:09 Mitsubishi Shipbuilding holds christening ceremony for LPG carrier "LAUREL PRIME"

2018 December 13

18:43 Coal exports via Rosterminalugol hit 19-millionth tonne mark
18:28 Port of Kaliningrad throughput in Jan-Nov rose 4% to nearly 13 million tonnes
18:25 Tideway completes installation of longest AC offshore wind export cable at Hornsea One in the UK
17:49 Hapag-Lloyd to cancel calls at Port of Bremerhaven
17:25 Building of Johan Sverdrup Phase II begins
17:19 Port of Vyborg 11-month cargo volumes soar 24% to 1.72 million tonnes
17:13 Seabridge first in Belgium to receive the SCA certificate
17:08 Jan De Nul cleans up polluted beaches along the coast in southern France
17:07 Bunker fuel prices at Far Eastern ports close the week lower
17:00 Murmansk Region will improve water safety regulations – Marina Kovtun
16:47 Port of Vysotsk cargo volume in Jan-Nov rises 6% to 16.86 million tonnes
16:36 Maersk Broker Bulk Chartering and NAODAN Chartering
16:30 Murmansk Region Governor is a member of revised State Commission for Arctic Development Issues
16:26 YILPORT Holding wins Port Operator Award at Lloyd’s List Global Awards
16:03 Rosmorport releases RFPs for design of an DF 12/14MW icebreaker
15:49 Jotun and Kansai Paint build relationship to meet marine and protective demand
15:46 Baltic Sea Ports Authority icebreakers assist merchant vessels in the Gulf of Finland
15:21 Containerships receives its first LNG-powered container vessel
14:44 Uncertainty lingers in fuel markets despite OPEC cuts
14:17 Maersk Line receives Containership Operator of the Year award
14:13 Iran-Indonesia to develop port cooperation
13:22 NOIA: U.S. territories need the Offshore Wind for Territories Act
13:12 QPS inks first "Green Loan" with BNP Paribas
12:48 Panama Canal signs agreement with Brazil's Port of Itaqui